The recipient of this award is chosen by the students themselves, for the professional course student whose work they feel deserves recognition.

This year, the award went to Grant Anderson, originally from Zimbabwe but now living in Scotland.

He lived in London for some 14 years and worked in the motorbike business before moving to Kirkcaldy in Fife where he has a brother.

He’s been a keen hobbyist for some time, learning his skills from YouTube, other internet sites and books.

He then put his skills to good use in renovating a flat, and the woodworking bug took over.

His first piece was an oak coffee table, with nine strips of steam-bent oak per leg, set off with brass decoration at each end.

It had five oak planks as its top, with breadboarded end-pieces held in place with pegs.

But his stand-out piece was a drinks cabinet with some 1.8 metres of tambour doors.

The external tambour doors also attached to an inner tambour mechanism, giving a real sense of motion as the tambour doors move in opposite directions.

Further complexity was added with the creation of a secret compartment.

Grant skilfully crafted burr elm cup holders into his design, but appearances can be deceptive.

Turn each of the burr elm holders and the secret compartment is revealed.

It means that an everyday blended whisky can be displayed and shared with mere acquaintances.

But, for good friends, a few twists of the cup holders reveal the hidden and expensive single malt whisky.

Grant will now pursue a new career in fine woodworking.